JEFF HARRY'S

POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY PLAYLIST

I believe that play is as important as breathing, sleeping, and love.  It's where so much of our happiness, fulfillment, and creativity comes from. 

JEFF HARRY

Welcome to the Positive Psychology Playlist!  

Inspired by the Flourishing Center's Certified Applied Positive Psychology Program, the goal is to gamify positive psychology modules, so you can incorporate them into your everyday life.  If you'd like to cultivate more of a certain aspect of positive psychology, click on the link below and try one of the play challenges.  Observe what occurs for you through the play.  Share your results with the Rediscover Your Play Tribe, tag @jeffharryplays on Instagram or Twitter.

 

It promises to be a fun, adventurous, and fulfilling ride.

 

Special Thanks To Louis Alloro and the CAPP.65 Los Angeles Cohort!    

Positivity Psychology

Aspects of Love


Definition of Love:

  • As a Noun (n):
    • a profoundly tender, passionate affection for another person
    • a feeling of warm personal attachment or deep affection, as for a parent, child, or friend
    • sexual passion or desire
    • a person toward whom love is felt; beloved person; sweetheart
    • used in direct address as a term of endearment, affection, or the like):
    • Would you like to see a movie, love?
  • As a Verb (v):
    • to have love or affection for: All her pupils love her
    • to have a profoundly tender, passionate affection for (another person)
    • to have a strong liking for; take great pleasure in: to love music
    • to need or require; benefit greatly from: Plants love sunlight
    • to embrace and kiss (someone), as a lover
What Happens When You Fall in Love ( Bartels & Zeki, 2000, cited in Peterson, 2007)
  • Neuroimaging scans of individuals who describe themselves as madly in love resemble that of cocaine addicts.
  • Pleasure centers are activated when viewing pictures of their loved one, compared to pictures of a friend or a neutral control.
Blinded by Love
  • “When mothers look at pictures of their own children, brain regions responsible for negative emotions and social comparison are deactivated” ( Bartels & Zeki, 2004, cited in Peterson, 2007)
  • (Until they become teens or the honeymoon phase is over)
Passionate vs. Compassionate Love
  • Passionate love brings people together
  • Compassionate love keeps people together
  • Passionate love is a chemically induced state that is not meant to last otherwise you wouldn’t be able to function
  • “Passionate love occurs at the beginning of an affair and is marked by extreme absorption and dramatic mood swings, from ecstasy to anguish.
  • Compassionate love is the unshakable affection shared by two people whose lives have become intertwined” (Peterson, 2007 p. 267)
Passion’s Shelf Life
  • Passion is subject to Hedonic Adaptation
  • We’re wired for variety
Typologies of liking, loving and more
  • Virtuous Love:
  • Affiliation:
    • We have a biological need for affiliation
    • A research study with laboratory rats showed that the mere physical presence of another rat reduced the physiological effects of stress. A non-stressed rat was most beneficial. (Kiyokawa et al. 2004)
    • Affiliation refers to “simply wanting to be associated with someone” (Peterson, 2007 p. 264)
    • ‘Misery loves company’
    • Same is true for people
    • Schachter (1959) found that students who were told they were expecting to be shocked as part of the experiment preferred to be in the presence of a stranger, compared to control.
  • Liking vs. Loving “I love you. But I don’t like you right now!”
  • In liking, people have a positive attitude toward each other.
    • 6 factors predispose people to liking someone (Peterson, 2007, p.265):
      • Proximity - other things being equal, we like those who live close to us
      • Similarity - other things being equal, we like those whose personality traits, values and beliefs are similar to ours
      • Complementarity of needs - other things being equal, we like those who satisfy our needs
      • High ability - other things being equal, we like those who are competent
      • Attractiveness - other things being equal, we like those who are physically attractive or otherwise pleasing
      • Reciprocity - other things being equal, we like those who like us




Love Challenges


In order to find our flow, we must create the conditions for a flow state to occur. INDIVIDUAL PLAY CHALLENGE

PLAY CHALLENGE WITH FRIENDS & LOVED ONES
  • Determine their Love Language and express your love to them through this language for one week
    • Ask them at the end of the week, do they feel any different towards you?
OUTSIDE YOUR COMFORT ZONE PLAY CHALLENGE
  • For one week, the way you give your love to your closest friends and family, choose to do the same for yourself
    • Identify ways in which you'd appreciate love and self-compassion and go all in loving yourself
  • Express your love freely to people that you are close to, but you have never said "I Love You Too."
    • See how that feels in your body when you do this





Find Your Inner Genius

Through Play

POSITIVITY 

Fixed Vs. Growth Mindset

Aspects of Love


Definition of Love:

  • As a Noun (n):
    • a profoundly tender, passionate affection for another person
    • a feeling of warm personal attachment or deep affection, as for a parent, child, or friend
    • sexual passion or desire
    • a person toward whom love is felt; beloved person; sweetheart
    • used in direct address as a term of endearment, affection, or the like):
    • Would you like to see a movie, love?
  • As a Verb (v):
    • to have love or affection for: All her pupils love her
    • to have a profoundly tender, passionate affection for (another person)
    • to have a strong liking for; take great pleasure in: to love music
    • to need or require; benefit greatly from: Plants love sunlight
    • to embrace and kiss (someone), as a lover
What Happens When You Fall in Love ( Bartels & Zeki, 2000, cited in Peterson, 2007)
  • Neuroimaging scans of individuals who describe themselves as madly in love resemble that of cocaine addicts.
  • Pleasure centers are activated when viewing pictures of their loved one, compared to pictures of a friend or a neutral control.
Blinded by Love
  • “When mothers look at pictures of their own children, brain regions responsible for negative emotions and social comparison are deactivated” ( Bartels & Zeki, 2004, cited in Peterson, 2007)
  • (Until they become teens or the honeymoon phase is over)
Passionate vs. Compassionate Love
  • Passionate love brings people together
  • Compassionate love keeps people together
  • Passionate love is a chemically induced state that is not meant to last otherwise you wouldn’t be able to function
  • “Passionate love occurs at the beginning of an affair and is marked by extreme absorption and dramatic mood swings, from ecstasy to anguish.
  • Compassionate love is the unshakable affection shared by two people whose lives have become intertwined” (Peterson, 2007 p. 267)
Passion’s Shelf Life
  • Passion is subject to Hedonic Adaptation
  • We’re wired for variety
Typologies of liking, loving and more
  • Virtuous Love:
  • Affiliation:
    • We have a biological need for affiliation
    • A research study with laboratory rats showed that the mere physical presence of another rat reduced the physiological effects of stress. A non-stressed rat was most beneficial. (Kiyokawa et al. 2004)
    • Affiliation refers to “simply wanting to be associated with someone” (Peterson, 2007 p. 264)
    • ‘Misery loves company’
    • Same is true for people
    • Schachter (1959) found that students who were told they were expecting to be shocked as part of the experiment preferred to be in the presence of a stranger, compared to control.
  • Liking vs. Loving “I love you. But I don’t like you right now!”
  • In liking, people have a positive attitude toward each other.
    • 6 factors predispose people to liking someone (Peterson, 2007, p.265):
      • Proximity - other things being equal, we like those who live close to us
      • Similarity - other things being equal, we like those whose personality traits, values and beliefs are similar to ours
      • Complementarity of needs - other things being equal, we like those who satisfy our needs
      • High ability - other things being equal, we like those who are competent
      • Attractiveness - other things being equal, we like those who are physically attractive or otherwise pleasing
      • Reciprocity - other things being equal, we like those who like us




Love Challenges


In order to find our flow, we must create the conditions for a flow state to occur. INDIVIDUAL PLAY CHALLENGE

PLAY CHALLENGE WITH FRIENDS & LOVED ONES
  • Determine their Love Language and express your love to them through this language for one week
    • Ask them at the end of the week, do they feel any different towards you?
OUTSIDE YOUR COMFORT ZONE PLAY CHALLENGE
  • For one week, the way you give your love to your closest friends and family, choose to do the same for yourself
    • Identify ways in which you'd appreciate love and self-compassion and go all in loving yourself
  • Express your love freely to people that you are close to, but you have never said "I Love You Too."
    • See how that feels in your body when you do this





Choice Map

Breakdown of The Choice Map


The choice map provides you an opportunity to see whether you an embracing a challenge from a Judgemental or Learner approach. By simply catching the judger thoughts, you can help yourself avoid falling into a negative spiral that leads to the judger pit. Choice Map Inquiry Institute Marilee Adams, Ph D. Change Your Questions, Change Your Life Here is the breakdown of the judger path and questions vs. the learner path and questions: Judger Path: Focuses on what is wrong. React

  • Automatic Reactions
  • Blame Focused
  • Win/Lose Relating
  • Leads to the JUDGER PIT
Judger Questions* include:
  • What’s wrong with me?
  • Whose fault is it?
  • Why are they so stupid?
  • How can I prove that I’m right?
  • Haven’t we been there, done that?
  • Why bother?
Learner Path: Focuses on possibilities and growth. Choose
  • Thoughtful Choices
  • Solutions Focused
  • Win/Win Relating
  • Leads to the Learner Path
Learner Questions* include:
  • What do I want?
  • What works?
  • What are the facts and what can I learn? • What are my choices?
  • What action steps make sense?
  • What’s possible?




Choice Map Play Challenges


Print Out Choice Map INDIVIDUAL PLAY CHALLENGE

  • Catch the judger. Log all the judger thoughts that you have and when you see them, run the thought through the Choice Map Method. See how many judger thoughts you can run through the Choice Map in one day
PLAY CHALLENGE WITH FRIENDS
  • Find a partner and for 48 hours, point out to each other whenever one verbalizes a judger thought
  • Help each other by running your thoughts through the Choice Map Method
OUTSIDE YOUR COMFORT ZONE PLAY CHALLENGE
  • For one week, log all of your judger thoughts that you notice and as you find them
    • Run each thought you catch through the Choice Map Method and observ what effect it has on you that week
  • At the end of the week, compare the number of judger thoughts you had at the beginning of the week to the end of the week





Luck

Press Your Luck


The Luck Factor, Richard Wiseman Lucky or unlucky people are responsible for much of their fortune through their thoughts and behaviors. 4 Basic Principles of Lucky People

  • They are skilled at creating and noticing chance opportunities
  • Make lucky decisions by listening to their intuition
  • Create self-fulfilling prophesies via positive expectations
  • Adopt a resilient attitude that transforms bad luck into good




Luck Play Challenges


INDIVIDUAL PLAY CHALLENGE

  • For a 48-hour period, log every good experience that happens to you, regardless of whether it is big or small
  • Each time, something good happens, ask yourself with curoisity: How Can It Get Any Better Than this?
  • Journal about the result
PLAY CHALLENGE WITH FRIENDS
  • Gather a group of your friends and prime each other by saying that you will have a lucky outing
  • Have the group point out and celebrate every time some unexpected positive action occurs (whether it is big or small) and be curious about where that leads
OUTSIDE YOUR COMFORT ZONE PLAY CHALLENGE





ENGAGEMENT

Savor

Press Your Luck


The Luck Factor, Richard Wiseman Lucky or unlucky people are responsible for much of their fortune through their thoughts and behaviors. 4 Basic Principles of Lucky People

  • They are skilled at creating and noticing chance opportunities
  • Make lucky decisions by listening to their intuition
  • Create self-fulfilling prophesies via positive expectations
  • Adopt a resilient attitude that transforms bad luck into good




Luck Play Challenges


INDIVIDUAL PLAY CHALLENGE

  • For a 48-hour period, log every good experience that happens to you, regardless of whether it is big or small
  • Each time, something good happens, ask yourself with curoisity: How Can It Get Any Better Than this?
  • Journal about the result
PLAY CHALLENGE WITH FRIENDS
  • Gather a group of your friends and prime each other by saying that you will have a lucky outing
  • Have the group point out and celebrate every time some unexpected positive action occurs (whether it is big or small) and be curious about where that leads
OUTSIDE YOUR COMFORT ZONE PLAY CHALLENGE





Flow

Finding A State of Flow


Dr. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Father of Flow What is Flow?

  • State of intense absorption: “In the zone.”
  • Feeling of energized focus, full involvement, and enjoyment in the process of the activity
  • “A psychological state that accompanies highly engaging activities.”
Frequent Flow correlates with:
  • Life satisfaction
  • Achievement
  • Better health
  • Creativity
Components of Flow:
  • The task is challenging and requires skill
  • We concentrate
  • There are clear goals
  • We get immediate (an unambiguous) feedback
  • There is a sense of control
    • A balance between skill and challenge
    • Mental focus or strenuous exercise
    • Intrinsic Motivation
Flow State Triggers: Steven Kotler, The Rise of Superman: Decoding the Science of Ultimate Human Performance Psychological triggers
  • Goal clarity
  • Immediate feedback
  • Challenge to skills ratio
  • Intense concentration
Environmental triggers
  • High consequences
  • Rich environments
  • Deep embodiment
Social triggers
  • Serious concentration
  • Clear, shared goals
  • Good communication
  • Familiarity
  • Equal participation and skill level
  • Risk
  • Sense of control
  • Close listening
  • Always say yes
Creative triggers
  • Creativity




Flow Play Challenges


In order to find our flow, we must create the conditions for a flow state to occur. INDIVIDUAL PLAY CHALLENGE

  • Journal about your Ikigai/Zone of Genius
    • Ask these questions (From The Book: The Big Leap By Gay Hendricks)
    • WHAT DO I MOST LOVE TO DO?
      • I love so much I can do it for long stretches of time without getting tired or bored
    • WHAT WORK DO I DO THAT DOESN'T SEEM LIKE WORK?
      • I can do it all day long without ever feeling tired or bored
    • IN MY WORK, WHAT PRODUCES THE HIGHEST RATIO OF ABUNDANCE AND SATISFACTION TO AMOUNT OF TIME SPENT?
      • Even if I do only ten seconds or a few minutes of it, an idea or a deeper connection may spring forth that leads to huge value
      • Whatever it is, find it and I want you to put the highest priority on doing some of it every day
    • WHAT IS MY UNIQUE ABILITY?
    • There is a special skill I’m gifted with
      • This unique ability, fully realized and put to work can provide enormous benefits to me and any organization I serve
PLAY CHALLENGE WITH FRIENDS
  • Ask your friends the following questions:
    • When have you seen me most alive?
    • When have you seen me the happiest?
    • What is one ability that I have that makes me truly unique?
    • What is one way in which I can contribute to the world that could have a tremendous impact?
  • Based on the answers to these questions, determine if there is a unifying thread between the answers and if so, come up with a plan to pursue that flow experience
    • Example: Your friends share that you are an amazing writer, so you decide how you are going to devote X amount of time per week on writing or you'll choose to attend a writing retreat
  • OUTSIDE YOUR COMFORT ZONE PLAY CHALLENGE
    • For one month, once you identify your Ikigai/Zone of Genius/Flow State, you commit to devoting a certain number of hours a day attempting to cultivate this state/experience
      • Each day, log your progress on tapping into this flow state as well as your happiness/fulfillment levels after each day, as they may fluctuate
      • By the end of the month, share with your friends what you have been able to create and/or cultivate and how you feel about the entire process
      • Take a risk to trust the universe and do whatever is necessary, regardless of how absurd or silly it may be, in order to tap into this flow state
        • You find that you write better after dancing by yourself, do it
        • You like to wear silly outfits because it puts you in a creative mindset, do it
        • You find skipping to bring you more happiness than simply walking, do it





RELATIONSHIPS

Love

Aspects of Love


Definition of Love:

  • As a Noun (n):
    • a profoundly tender, passionate affection for another person
    • a feeling of warm personal attachment or deep affection, as for a parent, child, or friend
    • sexual passion or desire
    • a person toward whom love is felt; beloved person; sweetheart
    • used in direct address as a term of endearment, affection, or the like):
    • Would you like to see a movie, love?
  • As a Verb (v):
    • to have love or affection for: All her pupils love her
    • to have a profoundly tender, passionate affection for (another person)
    • to have a strong liking for; take great pleasure in: to love music
    • to need or require; benefit greatly from: Plants love sunlight
    • to embrace and kiss (someone), as a lover
What Happens When You Fall in Love ( Bartels & Zeki, 2000, cited in Peterson, 2007)
  • Neuroimaging scans of individuals who describe themselves as madly in love resemble that of cocaine addicts.
  • Pleasure centers are activated when viewing pictures of their loved one, compared to pictures of a friend or a neutral control.
Blinded by Love
  • “When mothers look at pictures of their own children, brain regions responsible for negative emotions and social comparison are deactivated” ( Bartels & Zeki, 2004, cited in Peterson, 2007)
  • (Until they become teens or the honeymoon phase is over)
Passionate vs. Compassionate Love
  • Passionate love brings people together
  • Compassionate love keeps people together
  • Passionate love is a chemically induced state that is not meant to last otherwise you wouldn’t be able to function
  • “Passionate love occurs at the beginning of an affair and is marked by extreme absorption and dramatic mood swings, from ecstasy to anguish.
  • Compassionate love is the unshakable affection shared by two people whose lives have become intertwined” (Peterson, 2007 p. 267)
Passion’s Shelf Life
  • Passion is subject to Hedonic Adaptation
  • We’re wired for variety
Typologies of liking, loving and more
  • Virtuous Love:
  • Affiliation:
    • We have a biological need for affiliation
    • A research study with laboratory rats showed that the mere physical presence of another rat reduced the physiological effects of stress. A non-stressed rat was most beneficial. (Kiyokawa et al. 2004)
    • Affiliation refers to “simply wanting to be associated with someone” (Peterson, 2007 p. 264)
    • ‘Misery loves company’
    • Same is true for people
    • Schachter (1959) found that students who were told they were expecting to be shocked as part of the experiment preferred to be in the presence of a stranger, compared to control.
  • Liking vs. Loving “I love you. But I don’t like you right now!”
  • In liking, people have a positive attitude toward each other.
    • 6 factors predispose people to liking someone (Peterson, 2007, p.265):
      • Proximity - other things being equal, we like those who live close to us
      • Similarity - other things being equal, we like those whose personality traits, values and beliefs are similar to ours
      • Complementarity of needs - other things being equal, we like those who satisfy our needs
      • High ability - other things being equal, we like those who are competent
      • Attractiveness - other things being equal, we like those who are physically attractive or otherwise pleasing
      • Reciprocity - other things being equal, we like those who like us




Love Challenges


In order to find our flow, we must create the conditions for a flow state to occur. INDIVIDUAL PLAY CHALLENGE

PLAY CHALLENGE WITH FRIENDS & LOVED ONES
  • Determine their Love Language and express your love to them through this language for one week
    • Ask them at the end of the week, do they feel any different towards you?
OUTSIDE YOUR COMFORT ZONE PLAY CHALLENGE
  • For one week, the way you give your love to your closest friends and family, choose to do the same for yourself
    • Identify ways in which you'd appreciate love and self-compassion and go all in loving yourself
  • Express your love freely to people that you are close to, but you have never said "I Love You Too."
    • See how that feels in your body when you do this





MEANING

Purpose

Finding A State of Flow


Dr. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Father of Flow What is Flow?

  • State of intense absorption: “In the zone.”
  • Feeling of energized focus, full involvement, and enjoyment in the process of the activity
  • “A psychological state that accompanies highly engaging activities.”
Frequent Flow correlates with:
  • Life satisfaction
  • Achievement
  • Better health
  • Creativity
Components of Flow:
  • The task is challenging and requires skill
  • We concentrate
  • There are clear goals
  • We get immediate (an unambiguous) feedback
  • There is a sense of control
    • A balance between skill and challenge
    • Mental focus or strenuous exercise
    • Intrinsic Motivation
Flow State Triggers: Steven Kotler, The Rise of Superman: Decoding the Science of Ultimate Human Performance Psychological triggers
  • Goal clarity
  • Immediate feedback
  • Challenge to skills ratio
  • Intense concentration
Environmental triggers
  • High consequences
  • Rich environments
  • Deep embodiment
Social triggers
  • Serious concentration
  • Clear, shared goals
  • Good communication
  • Familiarity
  • Equal participation and skill level
  • Risk
  • Sense of control
  • Close listening
  • Always say yes
Creative triggers
  • Creativity




Flow Play Challenges


In order to find our flow, we must create the conditions for a flow state to occur. INDIVIDUAL PLAY CHALLENGE

  • Journal about your Ikigai/Zone of Genius
    • Ask these questions (From The Book: The Big Leap By Gay Hendricks)
    • WHAT DO I MOST LOVE TO DO?
      • I love so much I can do it for long stretches of time without getting tired or bored
    • WHAT WORK DO I DO THAT DOESN'T SEEM LIKE WORK?
      • I can do it all day long without ever feeling tired or bored
    • IN MY WORK, WHAT PRODUCES THE HIGHEST RATIO OF ABUNDANCE AND SATISFACTION TO AMOUNT OF TIME SPENT?
      • Even if I do only ten seconds or a few minutes of it, an idea or a deeper connection may spring forth that leads to huge value
      • Whatever it is, find it and I want you to put the highest priority on doing some of it every day
    • WHAT IS MY UNIQUE ABILITY?
    • There is a special skill I’m gifted with
      • This unique ability, fully realized and put to work can provide enormous benefits to me and any organization I serve
PLAY CHALLENGE WITH FRIENDS
  • Ask your friends the following questions:
    • When have you seen me most alive?
    • When have you seen me the happiest?
    • What is one ability that I have that makes me truly unique?
    • What is one way in which I can contribute to the world that could have a tremendous impact?
  • Based on the answers to these questions, determine if there is a unifying thread between the answers and if so, come up with a plan to pursue that flow experience
    • Example: Your friends share that you are an amazing writer, so you decide how you are going to devote X amount of time per week on writing or you'll choose to attend a writing retreat
  • OUTSIDE YOUR COMFORT ZONE PLAY CHALLENGE
    • For one month, once you identify your Ikigai/Zone of Genius/Flow State, you commit to devoting a certain number of hours a day attempting to cultivate this state/experience
      • Each day, log your progress on tapping into this flow state as well as your happiness/fulfillment levels after each day, as they may fluctuate
      • By the end of the month, share with your friends what you have been able to create and/or cultivate and how you feel about the entire process
      • Take a risk to trust the universe and do whatever is necessary, regardless of how absurd or silly it may be, in order to tap into this flow state
        • You find that you write better after dancing by yourself, do it
        • You like to wear silly outfits because it puts you in a creative mindset, do it
        • You find skipping to bring you more happiness than simply walking, do it





ACHIEVEMENT

Visualization

Visualization


How and Why does Visualization work? (From Flourishing Center CAPP) Maybe it’s “Ordinary Magic”? What is visualization doing?

  • Activating the placebo effect
  • Activating the attention bias
  • Regulates emotions
  • Moderates the physical effects of stress
  • Helps set goals and increase self-efficacy
  • Decreases the planning fallacy
Activating the placebo effect:
  • Prepares you for action and puts you in a state of readiness
  • Increases in confidence may activate the placebo effect
  • Visualizing an event or a situation happening puts that person in a state where they are ready for action. If before, you didn’t think it was possible for you to achieve this, and you start visualizing it happening your confidence increased. For example a student who wants to be a doctor can begin seeing herself in that roll, seeing herself as a doctor, working with her patients, seeing herself in med school, studying for the MCATs. The fact that she sees herself doing it, increases her confidence. Often times believing that she wants to go to medical school can begin visualizing herself as a doctor, seeing herself, doesn’t think she has what it takes, but if starts to visualize herself, you suddenly begin to see yourself as better able to do those things that you didn’t think you could do. You also send out nonverbal cues to the world around you about your changed state. By thinking about this happening I am getting myself psyched.
Activating the attention bias:
  • The tendency to focus on things that support your beliefs: Narrows and deepens awareness
  • Study: pro-life and pro-choice
  • Behavioral confirmation – do things to support
  • 2 groups of people read the same article, one group was pro-choice
  • See either opportunities or threats to your personal position
Regulates Emotions: Visualizing things helps control the emotions associated with it. For example someone who wants leave a job that they are miserable at. However, there’s a lot of fear and worry associated with starting that business they’ve always dreamt of. Visualizing the event happening stirs lots of emotions up, providing fertile soil for controlling and regulating those emotions. This is particu- larly powerful for people who are catastrophizers. Induces Positive Emotions:
  • A study by Nelis et al (2012) compared the effects to positive affect of mental imagery versus verbal processing, i.e., creating images of the words in your mind versus speaking words and thinking about what they mean.
  • Mental imagery cultivated more positive affect.
  • “If results can be translated from the lab to the clinic then imaging positive situations may help people feel more positive than only discussing them verbally in therapy.”
Moderates the physical effects of stress:
  • Visualization creates physical and emotional arousal
  • Vision vs. Visual Imagery:
  • “The brain does not know the difference between what it sees and what it thinks about” 88% overlap in recalling information as observing the information (Krelman, Koch & Fried, 2000)
Visualization and the Brain:
  • Visualization happens in the cerebral cortex (language, thinking, and problem solving)
  • Visual images > optic cortex
  • Sounds > auditory cortex
  • Tactile > sensory cortex
  • Cerebral cortex > limbic system > endocrine system and the autonomic nervous system > bodily functions
  • Visualization and the Body
  • Increased heart rate
  • Blood pressure
  • Because of this, the body reacts to the images in the brain as though they are real threats, and real opportunities
  • Reactions in the body like increased heart rate & blood pressure
  • Increased heart rate
  • Blood pressure
  • Electrodermal activity
  • Human body is designed to act when this happens
Help Set Goals and Increase Self-Efficacy:
  • Approach vs. Avoidance Goals
    • Thinking about what you don’t want attracts it in!
    • Must frame goals in the positive.
    • “Pink Elephant”
Self-Efficacy
  • You can do it!
  • What a person believes they can do with their skills under certain conditions (Maddux, 2002)
  • Self-efficacy is different than self-esteem. It is not you can do “You were great out there” to the overweight 9 year old after she forgot the routine, tripped over her own feet, and smashed into one of the other girls on stage. It is what you believe you can do.




Visualization Play Challenges


INDIVIDUAL PLAY CHALLENGE

  • Practice the Kylego Visualization Exercise, visualizing a year from now and describing it as if it already happened
  • Journal about it and see what comes up
PLAY CHALLENGE WITH FRIENDS & LOVED ONES
  • Do a Tunnel Visualization with your friends
OUTSIDE YOUR COMFORT ZONE PLAY CHALLENGE





VITALITY

Physical Activity

Breakdown of The Choice Map


The choice map provides you an opportunity to see whether you an embracing a challenge from a Judgemental or Learner approach. By simply catching the judger thoughts, you can help yourself avoid falling into a negative spiral that leads to the judger pit. Choice Map Inquiry Institute Marilee Adams, Ph D. Change Your Questions, Change Your Life Here is the breakdown of the judger path and questions vs. the learner path and questions: Judger Path: Focuses on what is wrong. React

  • Automatic Reactions
  • Blame Focused
  • Win/Lose Relating
  • Leads to the JUDGER PIT
Judger Questions* include:
  • What’s wrong with me?
  • Whose fault is it?
  • Why are they so stupid?
  • How can I prove that I’m right?
  • Haven’t we been there, done that?
  • Why bother?
Learner Path: Focuses on possibilities and growth. Choose
  • Thoughtful Choices
  • Solutions Focused
  • Win/Win Relating
  • Leads to the Learner Path
Learner Questions* include:
  • What do I want?
  • What works?
  • What are the facts and what can I learn? • What are my choices?
  • What action steps make sense?
  • What’s possible?




Choice Map Play Challenges


Print Out Choice Map INDIVIDUAL PLAY CHALLENGE

  • Catch the judger. Log all the judger thoughts that you have and when you see them, run the thought through the Choice Map Method. See how many judger thoughts you can run through the Choice Map in one day
PLAY CHALLENGE WITH FRIENDS
  • Find a partner and for 48 hours, point out to each other whenever one verbalizes a judger thought
  • Help each other by running your thoughts through the Choice Map Method
OUTSIDE YOUR COMFORT ZONE PLAY CHALLENGE
  • For one week, log all of your judger thoughts that you notice and as you find them
    • Run each thought you catch through the Choice Map Method and observ what effect it has on you that week
  • At the end of the week, compare the number of judger thoughts you had at the beginning of the week to the end of the week





VIA Strengths

Finding A State of Flow


Dr. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Father of Flow What is Flow?

  • State of intense absorption: “In the zone.”
  • Feeling of energized focus, full involvement, and enjoyment in the process of the activity
  • “A psychological state that accompanies highly engaging activities.”
Frequent Flow correlates with:
  • Life satisfaction
  • Achievement
  • Better health
  • Creativity
Components of Flow:
  • The task is challenging and requires skill
  • We concentrate
  • There are clear goals
  • We get immediate (an unambiguous) feedback
  • There is a sense of control
    • A balance between skill and challenge
    • Mental focus or strenuous exercise
    • Intrinsic Motivation
Flow State Triggers: Steven Kotler, The Rise of Superman: Decoding the Science of Ultimate Human Performance Psychological triggers
  • Goal clarity
  • Immediate feedback
  • Challenge to skills ratio
  • Intense concentration
Environmental triggers
  • High consequences
  • Rich environments
  • Deep embodiment
Social triggers
  • Serious concentration
  • Clear, shared goals
  • Good communication
  • Familiarity
  • Equal participation and skill level
  • Risk
  • Sense of control
  • Close listening
  • Always say yes
Creative triggers
  • Creativity




Flow Play Challenges


In order to find our flow, we must create the conditions for a flow state to occur. INDIVIDUAL PLAY CHALLENGE

  • Journal about your Ikigai/Zone of Genius
    • Ask these questions (From The Book: The Big Leap By Gay Hendricks)
    • WHAT DO I MOST LOVE TO DO?
      • I love so much I can do it for long stretches of time without getting tired or bored
    • WHAT WORK DO I DO THAT DOESN'T SEEM LIKE WORK?
      • I can do it all day long without ever feeling tired or bored
    • IN MY WORK, WHAT PRODUCES THE HIGHEST RATIO OF ABUNDANCE AND SATISFACTION TO AMOUNT OF TIME SPENT?
      • Even if I do only ten seconds or a few minutes of it, an idea or a deeper connection may spring forth that leads to huge value
      • Whatever it is, find it and I want you to put the highest priority on doing some of it every day
    • WHAT IS MY UNIQUE ABILITY?
    • There is a special skill I’m gifted with
      • This unique ability, fully realized and put to work can provide enormous benefits to me and any organization I serve
PLAY CHALLENGE WITH FRIENDS
  • Ask your friends the following questions:
    • When have you seen me most alive?
    • When have you seen me the happiest?
    • What is one ability that I have that makes me truly unique?
    • What is one way in which I can contribute to the world that could have a tremendous impact?
  • Based on the answers to these questions, determine if there is a unifying thread between the answers and if so, come up with a plan to pursue that flow experience
    • Example: Your friends share that you are an amazing writer, so you decide how you are going to devote X amount of time per week on writing or you'll choose to attend a writing retreat
  • OUTSIDE YOUR COMFORT ZONE PLAY CHALLENGE
    • For one month, once you identify your Ikigai/Zone of Genius/Flow State, you commit to devoting a certain number of hours a day attempting to cultivate this state/experience
      • Each day, log your progress on tapping into this flow state as well as your happiness/fulfillment levels after each day, as they may fluctuate
      • By the end of the month, share with your friends what you have been able to create and/or cultivate and how you feel about the entire process
      • Take a risk to trust the universe and do whatever is necessary, regardless of how absurd or silly it may be, in order to tap into this flow state
        • You find that you write better after dancing by yourself, do it
        • You like to wear silly outfits because it puts you in a creative mindset, do it
        • You find skipping to bring you more happiness than simply walking, do it